3.4.2.4 Investment Casting

Investment casting, sometimes known as the "lost wax" process, is used with a wide range of alloys, including carbon and alloy steels, stainless steels, titanium, nickel, cobalt and aluminum alloys. Tools consist of aluminum molds for injection molding the wax patterns. They are relatively inexpensive and require very little maintenance.

The process is more labor intensive than forging, and is more suited to lower production quantities. Investment casting is most advantageous for small and medium size castings of highly complex shapes, with very good dimensional precision and surface quality. Solidification rates cannot generally be controlled in this process.

Forgings offer essentially the same performance advantages over investment castings as noted above for foundry castings.

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Investment casting, sometimes known as the "lost wax" process, is used with a wide range of alloys, including carbon and alloy steels, stainless steels, titanium, nickel, cobalt and aluminum alloys. Tools consist of aluminum molds for injection molding the wax patterns. They are relatively inexpensive and require very little maintenance.

The process is more labor intensive than forging, and is more suited to lower production quantities. Investment casting is most advantageous for small and medium size castings of highly complex shapes, with very good dimensional precision and surface quality. Solidification rates cannot generally be controlled in this process.

Forgings offer essentially the same performance advantages over investment castings as noted above for foundry castings.

Return to Table of Contents

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Investment casting, sometimes known as the "lost wax" process, is used with a wide range of alloys, including carbon and alloy steels, stainless steels, titanium, nickel, cobalt and aluminum alloys. Tools consist of aluminum molds for injection molding the wax patterns. They are relatively inexpensive and require very little maintenance.

The process is more labor intensive than forging, and is more suited to lower production quantities. Investment casting is most advantageous for small and medium size castings of highly complex shapes, with very good dimensional precision and surface quality. Solidification rates cannot generally be controlled in this process.

Forgings offer essentially the same performance advantages over investment castings as noted above for foundry castings.

Return to Table of Contents

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