3.4.2.2 Weldments

Weldments are generally made from product such as bar, tubing and plate. Part shapes are economically made by burning, laser cutting, shearing or sawing, depending on complexity and thickness. Individual parts in a weldment can be made of different alloys, within the limits dictated by welding parameters. Tooling cost is very low, but the process is labor intensive. Bar and plate stock are rolled, which causes grain orientation with improved mechanical properties in the direction of rolling. Cold rolled stock exhibits a clean, flat surface, which often requires no clean-up.

Weldments may offer an advantage over forgings in low production quantities. The economic advantage of weldments decreases as production quantities increase and the economic advantage shifts to forgings. Applications where production volumes are initially low and growth is anticipated can often be introduced as weldments and converted to forgings with minimal development cost and no compromise in product integrity.

At times, forgings become part of a weldment. For example, when special features are to be added to a forging it is sometimes more economical to weld two forgings together than to forge the entire part. A good example is friction welding a bar of steel to a flange having a stub shaft to form a long axle shaft. Further discussions of this option are beyond the scope of this section.

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Weldments are generally made from product such as bar, tubing and plate. Part shapes are economically made by burning, laser cutting, shearing or sawing, depending on complexity and thickness. Individual parts in a weldment can be made of different alloys, within the limits dictated by welding parameters. Tooling cost is very low, but the process is labor intensive. Bar and plate stock are rolled, which causes grain orientation with improved mechanical properties in the direction of rolling. Cold rolled stock exhibits a clean, flat surface, which often requires no clean-up.

Weldments may offer an advantage over forgings in low production quantities. The economic advantage of weldments decreases as production quantities increase and the economic advantage shifts to forgings. Applications where production volumes are initially low and growth is anticipated can often be introduced as weldments and converted to forgings with minimal development cost and no compromise in product integrity.

At times, forgings become part of a weldment. For example, when special features are to be added to a forging it is sometimes more economical to weld two forgings together than to forge the entire part. A good example is friction welding a bar of steel to a flange having a stub shaft to form a long axle shaft. Further discussions of this option are beyond the scope of this section.

Return to Table of Contents

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Weldments are generally made from product such as bar, tubing and plate. Part shapes are economically made by burning, laser cutting, shearing or sawing, depending on complexity and thickness. Individual parts in a weldment can be made of different alloys, within the limits dictated by welding parameters. Tooling cost is very low, but the process is labor intensive. Bar and plate stock are rolled, which causes grain orientation with improved mechanical properties in the direction of rolling. Cold rolled stock exhibits a clean, flat surface, which often requires no clean-up.

Weldments may offer an advantage over forgings in low production quantities. The economic advantage of weldments decreases as production quantities increase and the economic advantage shifts to forgings. Applications where production volumes are initially low and growth is anticipated can often be introduced as weldments and converted to forgings with minimal development cost and no compromise in product integrity.

At times, forgings become part of a weldment. For example, when special features are to be added to a forging it is sometimes more economical to weld two forgings together than to forge the entire part. A good example is friction welding a bar of steel to a flange having a stub shaft to form a long axle shaft. Further discussions of this option are beyond the scope of this section.

Return to Table of Contents

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