3.3.4 Secondary Operations

Secondary operations are those required to bring the forging to the required shape, precision, mechanical properties or surface finish. These operations may include:

  • heat treatment
  • cold coining
  • straightening
  • machining
  • nondestructive testing
  • vibratory finishing
  • shot blasting
  • coatings such as paint and powder coat.

In some cases, special packaging is specified for purposes such as protecting during shipment or positioning uniformly to facilitate assembly. Secondary operations must be factored into the design of the forging so that processing requirements can be recognized in the design.

The costs associated with some secondary operations are traded off against tooling and processing costs. For example, it may be possible to produce a forging by developing the rough shape as an open die forging, or in a blocker die, and finish machining to develop the required precision. Or, finish machining cost may be reduced at increased tooling and processing cost by forging to more detail and closer precision using multiple operations. The decision is usually driven by the number of machining operations required, production quantities and raw material cost.

ting cost that produces more parts per hour. Lower forging pressures also tend to reduce tool maintenance and replacement cost, which is usually a part of the quoted piece price.

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Secondary operations are those required to bring the forging to the required shape, precision, mechanical properties or surface finish. These operations may include:

  • heat treatment
  • cold coining
  • straightening
  • machining
  • nondestructive testing
  • vibratory finishing
  • shot blasting
  • coatings such as paint and powder coat.

In some cases, special packaging is specified for purposes such as protecting during shipment or positioning uniformly to facilitate assembly. Secondary operations must be factored into the design of the forging so that processing requirements can be recognized in the design.

The costs associated with some secondary operations are traded off against tooling and processing costs. For example, it may be possible to produce a forging by developing the rough shape as an open die forging, or in a blocker die, and finish machining to develop the required precision. Or, finish machining cost may be reduced at increased tooling and processing cost by forging to more detail and closer precision using multiple operations. The decision is usually driven by the number of machining operations required, production quantities and raw material cost.

ting cost that produces more parts per hour. Lower forging pressures also tend to reduce tool maintenance and replacement cost, which is usually a part of the quoted piece price.

Return to Table of Contents

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Secondary operations are those required to bring the forging to the required shape, precision, mechanical properties or surface finish. These operations may include:

  • heat treatment
  • cold coining
  • straightening
  • machining
  • nondestructive testing
  • vibratory finishing
  • shot blasting
  • coatings such as paint and powder coat.

In some cases, special packaging is specified for purposes such as protecting during shipment or positioning uniformly to facilitate assembly. Secondary operations must be factored into the design of the forging so that processing requirements can be recognized in the design.

The costs associated with some secondary operations are traded off against tooling and processing costs. For example, it may be possible to produce a forging by developing the rough shape as an open die forging, or in a blocker die, and finish machining to develop the required precision. Or, finish machining cost may be reduced at increased tooling and processing cost by forging to more detail and closer precision using multiple operations. The decision is usually driven by the number of machining operations required, production quantities and raw material cost.

ting cost that produces more parts per hour. Lower forging pressures also tend to reduce tool maintenance and replacement cost, which is usually a part of the quoted piece price.

Return to Table of Contents

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